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International Journal of Biology Sciences

Vol. 6, Issue 1, Part B (2024)

Bacterial aetiologies of otitis media and their antimicrobial susceptibility in ear swab culture

Author(s):

Ruqayah Qubtan Taha, Tuhfa Tawfeeq Ibrahim, Noora Hamid Ibrahim and Osama A Mohsein

Abstract:

An acute otitis media infection occurs in the middle ear. Otitis media has three types: acute, chronic suppurative, and effusion. After upper respiratory infections, acute otitis media is the second-most common paediatric emergency department diagnosis. Otitis media is most common in children aged 6–24 months.
Aims of the study: Knowing the most common types of bacteria that cause otitis media infections and their sensitivity to a group of antibiotics.
Methodology: The retrospective study collected 1,000 ear swabs from January 10 to November 10, 2023. Without medical consultation, 500 male and female ear swabs were collected to record age, nutritional status, and antibiotic use. The samples were tested for bacteria using oxidase, catalase, Voges-Proskauer, Simmon's citrate, Indole, and methyl red after culture on blood and MacConkey agar. The Mueller-Hinton agar drug sensitivity test at Al-Habbobi Teaching Hospital used several antibiotics in sterile conditions.
Results: The study found no significant difference in age among participants. The frequency of Klebsiella spp. was highest in all samples, while Staphylococcus spp. was less frequent. Females had a higher frequency of Klebsiella spp than males. Proteus spp. was identical in both genders, while Pseudomonas was lower in females. Antibiotic usage was highest for AK, AMC, and IMP, with ATM having the lowest efficacy against otitis media infections. AZM was the most common antibiotic, followed by CAZ and AFB. The CIP and FOX repeats were significant in combating specific bacteria.
Conclusions: No significant age difference was found among the participants. In all samples, Klebsiella was the most common, and Staphylococcus was less common. Klebsiella spp. were more common in women. Females had lower Pseudomonas and identical Proteus spp. Amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and cefoxitin were the most common antibiotics, indicating their effectiveness in preventing and killing bacteria. Thus, health care workers ought to focus on these antibiotics to treat middle ear infections and prevent complications.
 

Pages: 94-99  |  139 Views  39 Downloads

How to cite this article:
Ruqayah Qubtan Taha, Tuhfa Tawfeeq Ibrahim, Noora Hamid Ibrahim and Osama A Mohsein. Bacterial aetiologies of otitis media and their antimicrobial susceptibility in ear swab culture. Int. J. Biol. Sci. 2024;6(1):94-99. DOI: 10.33545/26649926.2024.v6.i1b.192
International Journal of Biology Sciences

International Journal of Biology Sciences

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